Welcome

At the 7puzzle company, we produce regular number puzzles for our many followers from over 90 different countries throughout the world. The aim of 7puzzleblog.com is to help improve basic knowledge and confidence of number & arithmetic in a fun way.

Enjoy your visit and spread the message about the fabulous number puzzles at 7puzzleblog.com. Try the latest arithmetical challenge below, #49, as well as the other 1,000+ brainteasers at this site. You can also follow me and my tweets on twitter @7puzzle.

Click this link if you wish to find out more about our main school-based maths workshops, the 7puzzle experience.

Paul Godding, Director of the 7puzzle company

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#49

You decide to roll two normal six-sided dice, both containing the numbers 1-6, and then plan to multiply the two numbers showing. How many different possible answers could you obtain?

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#48

What is the greatest integer (whole number) less than 630,000 that can be written using all of the digits from 1 to 6?

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#47

If you multiply a number by 3 and then add 30, the result is the same as if you first added 17 to this number and then multiplied by 2. Is the value of this number 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5?

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#46

The number 4 is the smallest positive integer that has exactly three factors – 1, 2 and 4. When you have found the next-highest integer to have exactly three factors, calculate the sum of those three factors. What is it?

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#45

If you multiply two whole numbers together and then add 4, the result is 40. Which of the following could NOT be the sum of the two numbers?

12      13      15      18      20      37

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#44

In the number sequence which begins 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 12 . . . , which of the following numbers does NOT appear later in the sequence:

25     34     43     57     65     72     85     99

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#43

Using the numbers 2, 4 and 6 once each, together with + – x and ÷, find the FOUR target numbers from the following list that it is NOT possible to make:

12    14    16    18    20    22    24    26    28    30

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#42

Using the numbers 2, 4 and 6 once each, together with + – x and ÷, find the THREE target numbers from 1-10 that it is NOT possible to make.

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#41

Three of the following numbers add up to 47, but which ones? Your answer must contain three different numbers:

11    12    13    15    17    18    25    26    33    34    35    42

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