the 7puzzle game

the7puzzlecompanyAs the signature game of the 7puzzle company, and one which is regularly used during our workshops, the 7puzzle game is our most famous and popular creation to date.

Designed and produced in the summer of 2010 by Paul Godding, the 7puzzle game is very flexible as it is perfect for children aged 7 years and above, but also extremely challenging for older children, adults and the more experienced puzzle enthusiast.

As the 7puzzle game continues to play an integral part of our workshops, it has become very popular with children, teaching staff and parents.

7puzzle at techniquest

We were extremely proud when the Techniquest Science Discovery Centre in Cardiff approached us and asked permission to produce a larger version of the game to become a permanent exhibit at the centre (see above).  Since being unveiled in 2011, it has been earning rave reviews by the general public and visiting schools.

We were also very flattered when receiving an e-mail from an American university professor praising the 7puzzle game. The feedback can be viewed by clicking this link.

The 7puzzle game is a unique product as the contents of the game are kept in an eco-friendly distinctive black/lilac bag. This keeps the playing board clean and tidy, making it extremely difficult for the owner to lose the playing pieces.

7puzzle-2

.

How to Play

The playing board is a 7 by 7 grid of 49 squares, each square containing a number, colour and shape. When taking on the challenges, players must place all of the 14 playing pieces (7 of which are straight and 7 angled) onto the board, therefore leaving seven spaces.

The intention is that everything on the board will be covered up, except seven of a certain element, which may be a particular shape, colour or type of number, depending on the challenge being undertaken.

Most of the challenges, of which there are 42 altogether, are number-related. There are also a few easier shape challenges and some tougher colour challenges to complement the numeracy aspect. The 7puzzle game challenges should be attempted in the order shown on the instruction sheet as they become more difficult as you progress.

For instance, Challenge No.1 requires you to leave 7 even numbers uncovered. As the board contains 30 even numbers in total, this is quite an easy task to start off your 7puzzle adventure and ideal for the younger player who can be guided through, and taught about, even numbers at the same time.

For instance, the teacher could ask the class to find all the even numbers in each row and column on the board before attempting the puzzle. This type of learning activity could take place before each number challenge.

One of the many possible solutions for Challenge No.1 is shown below:

7puzzle

.

Use in the Classroom

As the challenges increase in difficulty, the 7puzzle game can continue to be used as a teaching aid, as described above, whether it is to improve mental maths skills or perhaps to reinforce existing knowledge by creating challenges against other players.

Timed challenges could be set or even head-to-head contests can take place if there are two or more copies available.

Teachers could even use the playing board to introduce concepts and theories of probability as well as fractions & percentages, decimal places and maybe even calculations involving area & perimeter.

7puzzle-6

.

Number Challenges

When undertaking the shape and colour challenges, it is quite obvious what needs to be left uncovered on the playing board, but it may not be so straightforward when taking on one of the 30 number challenges.

Players may not be aware of how many options are available on the board, so they have been listed here.  As mentioned earlier, teachers could even go through the various options with a class in a mini-lesson before attempting a particular challenge.

This list can be referenced either as an educational tool or perhaps used as a check-list to see if a challenge has been completed correctly. It is commonly used as an argument-settler, just like the dictionary in Scrabble!

Note: Remember, there are many more of each type of number in existence. We are only discussing the range of numbers present on the playing board.

7puzzle-7

For the initial set of number challenges, there are more than seven options available. The actual amount is given in brackets below. Players are therefore allowed to leave any seven of the numbers uncovered to complete that task:

  • Challenge 1: Even numbers (30)    2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 28, 30, 32, 36, 40, 42, 44, 48, 50, 54, 56, 60, 64, 66, 70, 72, 80, 84
  • Challenge 2:  Multiples of 3 (22)    3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 36, 42, 45, 48, 54, 60, 63, 66, 72, 81, 84
  • Challenge 3: Odd numbers (19)    3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 21, 25, 27, 33, 35, 45, 49, 55, 63, 77, 81
  • Challenge 4: Multiples of 4 (18)    4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, 44, 48, 56, 60, 64, 72, 80, 84
  • Challenge 6: Multiples of 5 (14)    5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 70, 80
  • Challenge 8: Multiples of 6 (13)    6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72, 84
  • Challenge 10: Factors of 60 (11)    2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 12, 15, 20, 30, 60
  • Challenge 11: Multiples of 7 (12)    7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, 70, 77, 84
  • Challenge 12: Factors of 84 (11)    2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 12, 14, 21, 28, 42, 84
  • Challenge 13: Multiples of 8 (10)    8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48, 56, 64, 72, 80
  • Challenge 14: Factors of 72 (11)    2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 12, 18, 24, 36, 72
  • Challenge 15: Multiples of 9 (9)    9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81
  • Challenge 16: Factors of 48 (9)    2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 48
  • Challenge 17: Square numbers (8)    4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64, 81
  • Challenge 18: Factors of 36 (8)    2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, 36
  • Challenge 19: Multiples of 10 (8)    10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80
  • Challenge 20: Single-digit numbers (8)    2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
  • Challenge 21: Factors of 80 (9)    2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 16, 20, 40, 80

 

7puzzle

To successfully complete the rest of the number challenges, players must leave uncovered all seven numbers shown below:

  • Challenge 23: Factors of 66   2, 3, 6, 11, 22, 33, 66
  • Challenge 25: Factors of 70    2, 5, 7, 10, 14, 35, 70
  • Challenge 26: Multiples of 11    11, 22, 33, 44, 55, 66, 77
  • Challenge 28: Factors of 24    2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24
  • Challenge 30: Factors of 54    2, 3, 6, 9, 18, 27, 54
  • Challenge 31: Multiples of 12    12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84
  • Challenge 33: Factors of 42    2, 3, 6, 7, 14, 21, 42
  • Challenge 35: Factors of 40    2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 20, 40
  • Challenge 36: Prime numbers    2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17
  • Challenge 38: Factors of 56    2, 4, 7, 8, 14, 28, 56
  • Challenge 41: Numbers in the 20’s    20, 21, 22, 24, 25, 27, 28

The final number challenge, Challenge 42, requires players to leave uncovered any seven numbers that total 100.  This challenge can be expanded so that any total from 50 through to 300 can become the target (see Target Challenges below).

.

Shape & Colour Challenges

As well as the above, the other 12 challenges (4 shape & 8 colour) are numbered as follows:

5.stars;  7.heptagons;  9.squares;  22.pink;  24.yellow;  27.green;  29.brown;  32.lilac;  34.red;  37.blue;  39.one of each colour;  40. circles.

.

Target Challenges

Choose a random number from 50 to 300 inclusive. Give your opponent 5 minutes to place all 14 pieces onto the board and see how close he/she can get to the target number you set when adding the seven numbers that remain uncovered.  Can they actually hit the exact target?

Now it’s your turn!  Your opponent now sets a different target number.  When time is up, the person who was nearest to their target number is the winner.

In a classroom (or team) situation with multiple copies available, the teacher or referee sets the same target number for all teams taking part.  Again, the team closest to the target number, at the end of a pre-determined time, is the victor.

7puzzle-8
 

The ‘7’ Challenge

Similar to the target challenge above.

Players, or teams, have two minutes to leave seven numbers uncovered as usual, which must include the ‘7’.  When time is up, all teams must add together the other six numbers that remain.  The team with the lowest total is the winner!

Any team who fails to leave the ‘7’ uncovered is automatically disqualified.

.

Mathematical Terms

Some of the mathematical terms used during the game are briefly explained here, just in case you get asked by younger members of the family:

maths1

  • Even number: any number which ends in 2, 4, 6, 8 or 0 – so it is divisible by 2.
  • Odd number: any number which ends in 1, 3, 5, 7 or 9 – not divisible by 2.
  • Multiple: these are numbers in a certain times table (e.g. 21 is a multiple of 7).
  • Factor: a number which can divide exactly into another number (e.g. 5 is a factor of 20).
  • Square number: the answer when a number is multiplied by itself (e.g. 36 is a square number as 6 x 6 = 36).
  • Single-digit number: a whole number (integer) from 1 to 9.
  • Prime number: a number that is only divisible by 1 and itself, no other factors.
  • Circle: you should know what this is, but Challenge No.40 is one of the toughest!
  • Square: a four-sided figure with each side being of equal length and each angle being a right-angle (measuring 90 degrees), therefore adding up to 360 degrees. With these characteristics, a square is a type of regular polygon.
  • Star pentagon: is the shape of a five-pointed star drawn with five straight strokes and each internal angle being 36 degrees (also called a pentagram). A five-sided polygon could be created from this by joining the five points with lines, and this would be called a pentagon.
  • Heptagon: a seven-sided figure with each length the same and each angle the same, therefore this is also a type of regular polygon.

Examples of some other regular polygons are equilateral triangle (3 sides), hexagon (6 sides), octagon (8 sides), nonagon (9 sides) and a decagon (10 sides).

.

Purchasing Options

Please get in touch if you wish to purchase the 7puzzle game which retails at £22 per game, plus £4 P&P.

There are additional options available if you wish to buy multiple copies.  All sets are housed in one eco-friendly bag and packaged in a specially custom-made 7puzzle box:

  • family set (2 copies): £43 plus £5 P&P,
  • mini classroom set (4 copies): £84 plus £6 P&P,
  • classroom set (6 copies): £123 plus £6 P&P.

Just click paul@7puzzle.com to get in touch should you wish to make a purchase.

We hope you enjoy the 7puzzle game.

7puzz

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *